Showing posts with label boxing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label boxing. Show all posts

August 24, 2015

Buakaw Practicing Muay Chaiya

Thanks to my friend and coach Tim Cartmell for sharing this clip.  I love Buakaw for a multitude of reasons, one of which is because he seems to be the consummate humble student.  Always learning, always training, always with a smile.  Much respect.

Enjoy the Thai Hair Metal and awesome ankle pick at 2:30!!!


December 6, 2014

Ross Enamait Interview

Our friend Ross Enamait over at Ross Training offers some sound advice for fighters, martial artists, and fitness freaks across the board in a recent interview on Expandercrank.  When Ross speaks, we should all listen.  Here is an excerpt:

How do you progress your fighters? Do you approach a beginner in the same fashion you approach a champion contender? Or is there something that you do differently with beginners and champions respectively, except of course for scaling weights and training intensity?
 
"Fighters progress through fighting more so than anything that ever occurs inside the gym. Speaking as a boxing trainer, when I consider a prospective opponent for one of my fighters, I look at what he has accomplished inside the ring. For instance, I look at his amateur background, who he has fought as a pro, and how active he has been in recent months.
   No one cares how much weight a fighter lifts or how many pull-ups he can perform. We want to know what the fighter can do inside the ring. The best way to gauge progress is by observing the fighter’s sparring as well as his actual bouts. A fighter should improve with each bout. Nothing is as important to a fighter as actual ring time and competitive experience.
   As for the novice vs. champion contender, beginners naturally require more work in the mental department. It is not uncommon for beginners to be quite nervous when sparring or fighting. They are dealing with anxiety and fear that the more seasoned fighters have learned to control. And it is these mental aspects which make real experience so critical. The gym will never prepare a novice fighter for the emotions that are experienced when fighting a stranger in front of a large crowd. True experience is earned one fight at a time. There are no shortcuts."

To read the entire article click here.

August 21, 2014

K-1 World Max Final

One word.... HELLSYEAH!!!!!!!!!!!  Paul Daley, Andre Dida, AND Buakaw!?!?!?!   WAR Buakaw!!!!  Someone please tell me this will be on PPV!?!?!?  More info by clicking here. 

August 11, 2014

The Body Shot - AKA Liver KO's

Wanna' spar??
Here is a great compilation of body shots.  Delayed onset, total incapacitation... the body shot SUCKS!  Liver shots are the most prevalent but trust me that a kick/punch to the spleen is just as bad and painful.  SO important for southpaws to protect their bodies well. Study and learn...


August 5, 2014

The Art of Defensive Boxing

Thanks to my coach and friend Tim Cartmell who shared this on his website Shen Wu.  Excellent highlight of some of the greatest boxers of our time.  Great head movement and footwork are cornerstones to defense.  And for my students asking about the check hook... at 2:35 of the first clip you will see Ricky Hatton receive THE picture perfect check hook!    Watch and learn...





July 13, 2014

Holly Holm to Fight With the UFC

New Mexico's very own Holly Holm just announced that she is going to be the newest bantamweight to join the ranks of the UFC in hopes of having the chance to knock champ Rhonda Rousey off her throne.  Considered by many to be the best pound for pound female boxer in the world, Holm decided to forgo her success in the boxing ring to tape up the four ounce gloves and try MMA.  So far it has been nothing BUT successful posting a unbeaten 7-0 record in pro bouts with six of those via knockout! 

The protege of Greg Jackson and Mike Winkeljohn hopes to be a major contender in the UFC and take the title from current champ Rousey.  We at The Ground Never Misses wanted to wish her luck and cheer on a fellow chile lover!








July 2, 2014

10 Manny Pacquiao Boxing Fundamentals

The author of this video uses the term "tricks" in reference to the 10 tactics Manny "Pacman" Pacquiao employs when fighting.  They are not unique to Pacman but he certainly has excelled at making them work and making them work really, really well! 



March 28, 2014

Head Trauma in Mixed Martial Arts - American Journal of Sports Medicine

Proponents of mixed martial arts (MMA) have long claimed it safe"er" then boxing and kickboxing due to the number of different ways one could win a match, not just percussive striking to the cranium.  That has always been the rub though, safer does not mean it is safe!  Obviously a number of factors and variables come into play with such a broad subject, but this is the first (to the best of my knowledge) academic study on head trauma in MMA. 

Just this week the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine released an article entitled "Head Trauma in Mixed Martial Arts" in their journal American Journal of Sports Medicine.  Using a descriptive epidemiology study, the doctors surveyed over 840 UFC matches between the years of 2006 and 2012 (this is notable as the UFC has been fully compliant with regulations and rules by this stage of their development ie. must wear 4oz gloves / banning of soccer kicks and stomps to the head etc.).  Thanks to my teacher Meynard for turning me onto this article.

The results are quite interesting, click here to read the entire abstract.  
Some serious food for thought for both professionals and hobbyists alike.  Lots of information coming to light regarding just how fragile our brain really is.  Below is the conclusion of the study:


Conclusion: Rates of KOs and TKOs in MMA are higher than previously reported rates in other combative and contact sports. Public health authorities and physicians should be cognizant of the rates and mechanisms of head trauma. Preventive measures to lessen the risks of head trauma for those who elect to participate in MMA are described.




February 1, 2014

Happy New Year of the Horse

Happy Chinese New Year!  What better way to celebrate the year of the Horse then with this AWESOME clip of footwork and movement (qualities of the horse) my friend Dave Teetz shared from Greg Nelson.  All of my students MUST watch this video and study his movement as this is precisely how you should shadow box!

Eat lots of dumplings and may the year of the Horse be fruitful and healthy for you!






For those interested I teach Chinese Martial Arts (Taiji / Bagua / Xing Yi / Mantis) privately and would be happy to talk to you about taking 2014 by the reigns by learning some martial arts and getting in shape!  Hit me up at 206-941-3232 or [email protected]

January 25, 2014

Vice Magazines 'Fightland' - Thai Prison Fights

Vice Magazine has launched a new online magazine geared towards the booming combat sports popularity which has surged in the past 10 years.  "Fightland" has some great stories and info on it such as this piece on Thai Boxing in the prison systems where inmates can work off sentences for fighting in the ring, and disagreements between fellow prisoners are dealt with maturely and fairly (novel idea).




Vice is one of my favorite news magazines because they bring stories we would never, ever hear about otherwise.  HBO is worth the money alone for Vice News:

January 11, 2014

Buakaw Goes Boom

Quite simply one of the best ever.  Period.  Study his use of the teep (front kick) and his relentless forward intention.

Enjoy


December 3, 2013

Know Your Roots: "Judo" Gene LeBell vs Milo Savage

Long before it was called MMA, back in the day before it was called a "lockdown," there was a man that could be argued the forefather of mixed martial arts LONG before most of the Gracie family was even born... "Judo" Gene LeBell!  A man of integrity and spirit, Gene was always game to fight as he demonstrated in his NHB fight versus pro boxer Milo Savage. 

Check out this great mini-documentary from Roots of Fight!

Roots of Fight - Gene LeBell vs Savage featuring Ronda Rousey from Roots of Fight on Vimeo.

August 23, 2013

Prince Naseem Hamed HL

Amazing footwork.  Uncanny understanding of range.  KO power in both hands (notice how he switches stances).  Prince Naseem Hamed will go down in history as one of boxing's greatest fighters.  Though I would never advocate the cockiness and bravado he exhibits, his style is fun and unique to watch.  Enjoy on your unproductive Friday:



March 27, 2013

I Still Have a Soul.,..

Fortunately, and unfortunately I can relate to most aspects of this video as of late.  A lot said without a word spoken:


February 28, 2013

Ramon "The Diamond" Dekkers Rest in Peace

It is with a heavy heart I pass on the news from Sherdog that Dutch sensation Ramon Dekkers passed away yesterday at the age of 43 in his hometown of Breda, Holland.  According to the early reports he was biking when he collapsed and passer-by's could not revive him. 

Ramon may be a "new" name to some, but for those of us who have been following kickboxing Ramon is nothing short of a legend posting an unbelievable career record of 186-33-2 before hanging up his gloves in 2006!  No... you did not misread... 186 victories alone, and lets not forget to mention the 95 KO's on the path to 186 victories!    That is a 51% KO rate for those keep track at home.  "The Diamond" as he was known, was one of the sharpest fighters ever to come out of Holland. 

One cannot help but wonder if the years of hard training and abuse contributed to his early passing (WAY too early), but either way lets remember the man for what he was... a true warrior and sportsman! 

My condolences and thoughts go to his family and fight crew.  May he rest in peace.

(Carl Orf's Carmina Burana is THE best fight music!!!!)

February 8, 2013

Mad Boxing Skills From Little Girl

This little one is simply too cute, and a bit scary all at the same time!  Props to her pops for teaching her well.  She moves better then most adult men I see. 


February 3, 2013

Drew Barrymore Naked Knock Out

I figured no one would be paying attention today with the Superbowl on and what not, so enjoy the view....


January 4, 2012

Kickboxing - Combatives - Kali Classes Seattle, WA.

Kick 2011 in the head and start 2012 off with a right lead, stop by Three Harmonies Martial Arts and start training today!  We offer both group and private lessons in various disciplines such as kickboxing, Shen Wu Combatives, Pekiti Tirsia Kali, and a number of traditional Chinese martial and healing arts as well.

Our group classes are comprised of a combination of both striking and basic grappling that is self defense based, not stylistically based.  Students can expect to learn basic striking and covering, mitt work and sparring drills, stand up wrestling and grappling, as well as ground proofing to ensure students are well versed and skilled in all ranges of combat.

We also offer Pekiti Tirsia Kali training for those interested in the Filipino bladed arts.

We have fun while we train and work hard!  If this sounds like the place for you, stop by and say "Hi" and we can set you up with some training.   You can also drop me a line at 206-941-3232 or email me at [email protected]

Click here to check out our 2012 schedule!

To set up a private lesson with Jake contact him via phone or email.

JANUARY SPECIAL FOR NEW STUDENTS: NO REGISTRATION FEE ($40 SAVINGS) WHEN YOU SIGN UP!

November 8, 2011

"Good Night Joe Frazier. I Love You Dear Friend."

Could not surmise it better then with George Foreman's words in response to the news of Smokin' Joe Frazier's passing yesterday of cancer at the young age of 67.  For the entire story on ESPN click here!

Fans of the pugilistic arts should need to introduction to one of the greatest boxers ever to live.  I have no personal experience to speak of, only admiration for a man tougher then nails, and sharper then a razor!  I wish him the most peaceful of journeys in his next big adventure.

Peace
Jake

May 18, 2011

The Body Shot

Body shot.  Liver shot.  Body rip.  Hitting the bread-basket.  Spleen shot.  Many names represent what is essentially the sweet science of striking the trunk of a fighter.  Minimal observation will note that one does not want to strike to the sternum or upper torso, but rather towards the "floating" ribs which poorly protect the liver on our right side, and our spleen on the left.  The so called solid organs.

Seattle's very own Ivan Salaverry:



I have been working body hooks with my boxing coach lately, and subsequently I have been reviewing it with my striking students.  I must admit a strange fetish with body shots.  Outside of choking a fool out, there is nothing quite as gratifying as hitting someone to the body, and watching them consciously quit!  Though often referred to as a body knock out, the victim of a brutal body shot is fully awake, yet the body will not allow you to continue.  Mentally you want to stand up and fight, but the pain and the spasm that is caused causes an exuberant amount of pain and leaves a unique taste in ones mouth!

My boy Crocop back in the Pride days.


Here is a great breakdown from MMA Junkie of what is happening physiologically:

Q. Dr. Benjamin: I have a question for you that's driving me nuts. I've been fighting and sparring for a long time, and over the years I've had all kinds of injuries -- separated shoulders, deep bruises, stress fractures, you name it. However, in all that time I managed to avoid ever taking a serious gut/liver shot until recently. And I think I can easily say that this was one of the most painful things I've ever felt. It was like my entire brain shut down to anything but the pain. Once that subsided, it got me thinking: why does a well placed gut shot hurt so badly? What organ or collection of organs is it that sends a big, fat "ouch" racing up my spinal column? Granted, separating my shoulder was incredibly painful, but even that didn't compare to the gut shot in terms of sheer physical agony. (From William C. Jenkins)
A. Wow. Where are the easy questions? Please allow me to use my knowledge, training and experience to work through this one since my search of the medical literature did not find any good formal studies on this topic.

The"gut" and/or liver shot is often debilitating to say the least. But I believe that there may be two separate and distinct mechanisms related to this incapacitating phenomenon.

First the generic gut shot.

A gut shot is simply blunt force trauma to the abdomen that causes significant pain and difficulty breathing to the recipient. This mechanism has been widely described as related to spasm of the diaphragm. Here goes the dreaded anatomy and physiology lecture. (Sorry, blame it on Bill. He asked the question.)

The diaphragm is a large flat muscle that runs horizontally separates the thoracic cavity (chest, lung and heart) from the abdominal cavity (belly, organs and guts). It acts like a bellow that moves (contracts) up and down changing the pressure within the thoracic cavity in order to help the lungs fill and release air (respiration/breathing). When struck the diaphragm can, for lack of a better word, "cramp" (spasm) causing significant pain and difficulty breathing since it is not moving properly to help the lungs move air.

This has also been commonly described as the "solar plexus" (which, by the way, is 
not a medical term). I first learned about the solar plexus while watching "wrastlin" on TV on Saturday nights as a little kid in Houston. Man, whatever happened to Gorgeous George, the Von Erich's, Dick Murdoch, Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka and the Masked Mexican Assassin El Diablo – talking about living room throw downs and putting your little brother in a sleeper hold!! Pardon me. I digress.

The second mechanism is blunt trauma to a solid organ or the dreaded "liver shot." Abdominal organs for the most part are covered with a thin but very tough fibrous membrane called a capsule. The capsule of solid organs (liver, spleen, kidneys, etc.) does not like to be stretched or deformed. The capsule of hollow organs (intestines, bladder, stomach, etc.) is specifically designed to accommodate stretching.

The liver is the largest solid organ in the abdomen and quite superficial, which leaves it poorly protected. It is on the upper right side (right upper quadrant) of the belly just above the belly button and extends above the lower border of the rib cage. So a large portion of the liver is left unprotected and relatively exposed to a well placed body shot.

When a solid organ takes a forceful blow and the overlying capsule is stretched, 
severe pain ensues. Once again, it is the body's attempt to protect itself from further harm or rupture of an organ. Reflexively (without thought), the combatants arms come down to cover the midsection and many times the injured person will fall to the ground and assume a modified fetal position to further protect. The fight is over or soon will be. The primitive instincts of the body have gone into override and are taking on a strictly defensive posture.

Legendary fighters have learned that when you hurt your opponents with a head shot, they will cover their face. Therefore, the next blows should be delivered to the now-exposed body (abdomen/belly). If these clean body shots do not finish the fight, the reflexive covering of the abdomen will lower the hands and leave your opponent's chin begging for more.

High quality MMA is really 95 percent mental. At the most elite levels, everyone has game. But the combatant who can out think his or her opponent on that particular night has a tremendous advantage.

That's why the combatant with greater athleticism or a superior physique doesn't always win.



Big thanks to Ross at Rosstraining.com for this compilation:


One of the most overlooked, and under trained, attributes in the striking arts is proper angulation when throwing, especially on the bag.  You need to "see" your target and hit is appropriately.  Make sure you are practicing your shovel hooks, lead hooks, rear hooks etc.  Pay close attention to the angle in which your fist is hitting.  Start incorporating body shots into your repertoire and your sparring will go through the roof!

Enjoy,
Jake