Showing posts with label self defense. Show all posts
Showing posts with label self defense. Show all posts

September 6, 2015

2015 Carlos Machado Seattle Seminar

We are very fortunate to have Red-black belt Professor Carlos Machado visit the Pacific NW once again on November 1st, 2015 for a four hour intensive seminar from 12-4pm!  If you have never had the privilege to train with Carlos then do yourself a favor a give yourself an early X Mas gift.  His grasp of the fundamentals... what can I say... he has forgotten more Jiu Jitsu than most of us will ever know!
   Come experience what over 40 years on the mat can offer you.  Visit the NW Jiu Jitsu Academy (941 N. 95th St Seattle, WA.) for more information or to register ASAP, as space is limited and this will sell out.

August 24, 2015

Buakaw Practicing Muay Chaiya

Thanks to my friend and coach Tim Cartmell for sharing this clip.  I love Buakaw for a multitude of reasons, one of which is because he seems to be the consummate humble student.  Always learning, always training, always with a smile.  Much respect.

Enjoy the Thai Hair Metal and awesome ankle pick at 2:30!!!


August 11, 2015

"Balintawak Eskrima" by Sam Buot Sr. - Book Review

Tambuli Media has once again facilitated getting one of the foremost authorities on FMA, Sam Buot Sr., to sit down and write a comprehensive text on Balintawak Eskrima.  Without a doubt Mark Wiley (founder of Tambuli Media) is the greatest gift to Filipino Martial Arts in the 20th century as he has managed to get masters to speak whom may of otherwise died without sharing this knowledge.  "Balintawak Eskrima" by Sam Buot Sr. is arguably one of the more important treatise Tambuli has published. 

Balintawak Eskrima has a reputation for being incredibly fast, overwhelming, and its practitioners are notorious for their disarming prowess.  Buot tries to cover the foundation of the art within 240 pages and I must say I think he does a commendable job.   After a brief history Buot dedicates 30 pages to the masters of Balintawak from Anciong Bacon, to Dr. Cres Go.  This is the heart of the book.  The loyalty and respect Buot displays in his detailed biopic of each teacher is inspiring.  To get a glimpse into the lives of any one of these teachers is a treat, but Buot really does an amazing job highlighting the masters of the art, many of whom none of us in the west would ever even know about otherwise. 

Buot insists the core of Balintawak is in the defense, which in his opinion is the most difficult to master and why he dedicated three chapters to the subject unto itself.  One of the trademarks of Balintawak is their fast response while blocking or covering.  The speed in which they grab the weapon and/or their opponents hand can never be properly conveyed in print media, but Buot does an excellent job especially transliterating the Buot Ball Concept. 

Throughout the book Buot uses different senior students under him showcasing the various generations of Balintawak who all bring something unique and different to the table.  I really like this small detail because it shows the heart and dedication of loyal students as well as an unspoken level of respect and admiration from the teacher to said students.  One of the only criticisms I have of the book is once again photography wise where we have two demonstrators wearing the same style and color of clothing and the photos are sometimes cropped too tightly.  When it comes to the flow of photographs and the comprehension of the student these minute details are extremely important in this reviewers opinion. 

Part 5 which includes chapters 12-14 focus on application and techniques of Balintawak illustrating their renowned disarming arsenal.  Buots decades of experience shine through in this section with little nuggets of info sprinkled in between the lines.  He speaks of feints, fakes, and what many would call "dirty" tactics but in reality... this is self defense!  As an attorney he also offers a short, but concise chapter dedicated solely to knife fighting.  It is one page long and worth the cost of the book itself.  I am not going to summarize the chapter here to encourage you to seek it out and read it yourself, but may I say in a world of machismo and bravado it is refreshing to hear a voice of reason and common sense in the FMA!  Kudos Mr. Buot. 

With each book Mark Wiley sends me to review I can see the hard work and effort he puts into each published text.  I feel like a broken record but "Balintawak Eskrima" by Sam Buot Sr. is Tambuli's best FMA book yet!  I cannot recommend this book highly enough to practitioners of FMA, historians, or just general martial artists looking for a solid read.  And for those practitioners of Balintawak I cannot believe you can look at this book as anything less than THE treatise on an amazing legacy that is still growing. 

To purchase "Balintawak Eskrima" click here

And for those folks in the Pac NW whom are interested in learning Balintawak, we are fortunate enough to have Prof Bobby Taboada coming to town in October 2015.  Check out Seattle Balintawak for more information. 

June 15, 2015

The Evolution of Rener Gracie the Teacher

Prof Rener Gracie chose Seattle, WA. to host his first 'Super Seminar' a couple of weekends back on May 31st.  Four seminars back to back to back to back, where Rener treated well over 80 participants per session to his patented good humored teaching style.  One thing that I noticed this year is that Rener is really showing his maturity both in the depth of his grappling knowledge, but more importantly via his teaching style.

I have tried to support any and all events Craig Hanuami hosts in town, and by going to Rener with my student and friend Lara it enabled me to wear a bit of a different hat then previous years.  I went as a teacher and observed Rener with my "coaching" eyes and what I saw was a man growing into a well seasoned teacher.  After all taking on a full day of multi-topical seminars is quite the daunting task in and of itself, but more difficult is the ability to walk the line of information overload with participants.  We decided to attend the first and last seminars; Cross Choke Mastery and Self Defense respectively due to our interests and time constraints.


Cross Choke Mastery was the first seminar of the day and right off the bat I noticed a difference in Rener.  Don't get me wrong there was still his patented command of the room and warm personality, but a calmness has entered his voice that I can only equate with a wisdom and comfortableness in the environment he is teaching.  An attribute many of us would foolishly assume comes with teaching hundreds of thousands of hours on the mat, but let me tell you that this engaging energy does not just happen.  It is something cultivated and honed.  What I am saying is Rener Gracie has worked very hard on becoming an excellent instructor and now more then ever it shows!

Dealing with people is difficult.  Teaching adults can be damn near the most challenging endeavor one can embark on.  Rener not only controls a room but engages each individual and goes out of his way to make the technique(s) as fundamentally basic as he can.  I did not say simplify, but rather break each movement down to its core and make sure that even the newest white belt understood the principle conveyed.  I listened in as he helped others around us and his voice and calm demeanor do nothing but help students learn.

Rener assisting Lara in the procurement of my lunch money!
Technique wise he methodically progressed from "This is a cross choke" to strategies in getting the choke set up.  Cross chokes are incredibly difficult for me to get at all, and the details offered in Rener's 90 minutes certainly have put me in a better position these last two weeks though I must admit I have not nailed a successful cross choke as of yet, but I am maintaining mount much better!

We came back about 6 hours later for the Self Defense course and after adjusting to the wet rag of air welcoming our arrival to an oxygen deprived gym Rener kicked off the last seminar of the day.  The physical exhaustion showed both on teacher and students alike but Rener was steadfast on his course and did an excellent job keep the energy and techniques flowing.  I would venture to say this session was a bit more scattered then the earlier one but that also may have been due to more varied questions being asked on such a broad subject.  For those who were brave enough to stick out the entire day, it was showing.  Physical exhaustion was trumped solely by mental fatigue especially on the white and blue belts.

This is where you see seminars/teachers crash and fail, but as always there is Rener carrying the crowd on his shoulders and keeping energy levels high where he shared a handful of essentials when it comes to defending oneself.  A bit different then what I have been taught I thought this seminar gave a great peek into the world of Rener's grandfather Helio Gracie.  After all self defense IS why Helio created Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and for the most part many of the techniques were taught as Helio has passed them down from one generation to the next.  The sole criticism I have is the final drill on Sunday the "Zombie Attack Drill" was not well received by the majority of the female contingent I noticed.  My partner asked me to stay and not allow other random folks to be jumping in and working, and I noticed the majority of females and their partners (male or female) were opting out.  Such drill where we change partners every few seconds have been, in my experience, poorly received especially at seminars as folks are quite leery about the training partners they choose.  Food for thought for future seminars.

Once again I cannot encourage you enough to train with Rener Gracie if the opportunity even remotely arises.  I am not sure I would suggest a 6 hour marathon simply because your retention rate will tank well before even the 5th hour, but getting on the mat with this man needs to be on your grappling bucket list.  I cannot thank Craig for giving me the opportunity to train with Rener way back when I was a blue belt to now (I owe you a thousand private lessons!!).  Big thanks to my partner Lara, the seminar was a blast as was working with you.  And last but certainly not least a huge thanks to Rener who took time to visit us though he has a little bambino on the way (best of luck to you and your family).  We really appreciate your tutelage and time at such an important crossroads in your life. 


May 28, 2015

"The Secret Art of Derobio Escrima" - Book Review

One of the greatest things about being involved in the martial arts for 25+ years is that you get to see your friends and training partners grow in the art, excel in training, and with most, eventually they give back.  Professor Dan Medina of the rarely seen art Derobio Escrima is no exception as he has finally put out a treatise on his style and fighting method!

I met Dan in Albuquerque, NM. where we both had a short layover in life.  Demonstrating the art of Derobio at any opportunity he had, what struck me vividly about Dan was his unflinching willingness to share his art.  For a "secret" style his heart is too big to hold back, and perhaps to a fault the book "The Secret Art of Derobio Escrima" is no different.

One hundred and forty five pages is barely enough to scratch the surface of any system but Medina does a solid job of not getting too verbose and trying too hard to cover EVERY thing in a system... it's just not possible.  Instead Medina focuses on just a handful of techniques that represent the integral locking and counter locking movements Derobio is renown for.  Honestly a lot of the details are so minute that it would be damn near impossible to capture in a print format.  It seems Dan knew this and therefore did not try to over saturate the text but rather offer a taste of what the style is like.

The book opens with a wonderful chapter on the history of both Derobio and Dan Medina, both of which are fascinating histories.  Arguably the best chapter of the book, but I have been nostalgic for historical text lately so perhaps the opinion is a bit biased.



From there Dan dives right into the heart of the system and the fundamentals.  He includes a quick chapter on etiquette and how to properly hold your weapon etc.  A topic often overlooked but important in the context of martial arts, but more specifically weapon based arts.  The techniques shown are not what I would call super advanced though most folks do overestimate how difficult it is to properly execute a standing submission/lock, so lots of personal instruction and practice is surely needed.  I will offer this tip... pay attention closely to what Prof. Medina does with his free/checking hand in many of the photos.  The forearm check is surely not unique to Derobio but I will say that I have seen few execute it as smoothly and perfectly as Dan!

The sole criticism I harbor for "The Secret Art of Derobio Escrima" is that some of the pictures are unclear and a bit cramped.  Perhaps it is  my old eyes starting to fail me but I find it sometimes difficult to see what it is happening in the picture.  There are also a handful that are cropped too tightly and are cutting off parts of demonstrators.

Once again Tambuli Media brings you something different and fun.  If rare systems of Filipino martial arts interest you then make sure you add "The Secret Art of Derobio Escrima" to your shelf.  Click here to order today! 


May 22, 2015

Rener Gracie Returns to the Emerald City

We are just over a week away from Rener Gracie returning to the Seattle area for another round of seminars.  Next Sunday will be a marathon day of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and self defense with four seminars back to back to back to back!! 

I have said it tons before but just in case you weren't listening... Rener is one of the young guard coming up under Rorion and Helio who is a bit of an anomaly.  For being so young he is without a doubt one of the best instructors I have stumbled across.  Confident, engaging, with a predetermined lesson plan that all gets packaged up with his quick witted humor a Rener seminar is not to be missed. 

Open to all experience levels and affiliations.


April 18, 2015

State Knife Laws


State Knife Law Infographic by KnifeUp.

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March 9, 2015

Tim Cartmell Seminars Portland, OR. March 20-22nd 2015

Martial genius Tim Cartmell will be returning to the Rose City (Portland) on March 20-22nd of this year.  Truly not an opportunity you want to miss, Tim will be covering all aspects of self defense and grappling.

All Classes Held at Ecole de Budo (7506 N. Chicago Ave. Portland, OR.)

Friday, March 20th - 6:00PM - 8:00PM
Saturday, March 21st - 10:00AM - 1:00PM / lunch break / 2:00PM - 5:00PM
Sunday, March 22nd - 9:00AM - 11:00AM

Price is $100 for SOB members and $150 for non-members

March 2, 2015

Surviving A Gunfight with Lt. Bob Stasch of the Chicago PD

Our friend Darrin Cook over at Big Stick Combat has a great blog where he brings many great perspectives and opinions to the martial arts self defense realm.  He is a realist and seems to have common sense hence why he often posts about 21st century combat; ie. gun defense. 

It has been my experience that the overwhelming majority of folks involved in the martial arts have about 0-5% knowledge base when it comes to guns.  That is an all encompassing statement (obviously I am ignoring variable demographics) but in all reality the majority of people I run across have not even fired a weapon before let alone know what to do if faced with an armed opponent (weapons are more and more prevalent in assault cases).  So when Darrin shares a great clip like this one I tend to listen and learn. 

Lt. Bob Stasch has survived  14 gun fights in his nearly 35 years of service on the Chicago Police force.  Few individuals have such experience and are alive to speak of it.  I have included the video interview and also provided the highlights from the interview (thanks to Darrin):



  • Go for head shots instead of center-of-mass shots, especially at very close range, where most gunfights occur.
  • Practice shooting a 6-inch paper plate. If you can hit the plate, you can hit the head.
  • Most of his gunfights were under 12 feet.
  • Train for instinctive, point shooting instead of aimed shooting.
  • In most instances, your off hand is occupied doing something else –be prepared to shoot one-handed.
  • Carry a minimum of 2 extra magazines.
  • Carry a backup weapon in case your gun malfunctions or you’re disarmed.
  • Lieutenant Stasch likes a lightweight .38 revolver as a backup.
  • He carries a Sig Sauer P220 in .45 because of the feel in the hand “The key to being a good handgun shooter is to have a weapon that’s an extension of your hand. Don’t get the gun that people recommend –get the gun that feels right in your hand. Go to a gun store and pick up every gun with your eyes closed, pick the one that feels like a 6th finger.”

 Lt. Stasch's findings are congruent with the NYPD's SOP 9 study on combat cases: click here to be redirected.

Food for thought here no matter what your opinion of firearms is.  Are you prepared? 

January 15, 2015

Bas Rutten and Self Defense

Legendary MMA champion, lifetime martial artist, and all around nice guy Bas Rutten recently took to social media to share his thoughts on self defense, grappling, and the best art for self protection in todays world.  As always Bas offers some great insights and food for thought, morsels we should all chew on given this mans pedigree.

Bas recently answered a fan’s question on his Facebook page regarding BJJ and self defense. Check out his answer:
” Question from fan, this is like the 8th I get about this, I answered a while ago on one of the posts, this time I figured to post it so that you can read it as well
QUESTION:
I have been hearing about your amazing work with Judo, Catch Wrestling, Jujitsu and I need your help.
I have been studying Mauy Thai for 3 years and I want add an good grappling art for real life street self defense.
In your expert opinion which good grappling art offers real life street self defense ?
Many Thanks.

 ANSWER:
    I would say BJJ with and without a Gi would be good. Of course you don’t wanna end up on the ground with friends of the attacker trying to kick you in the face, (that’s what people always say, and that’s why they say it’s “not good for street fighting” but that is of course BS)
    Just understanding leg locks and all other locks is very important, in a street fight you can submit somebody really fast (if he doesn’t know the ground) so even when his friends are helping, its ALWAYS better to have ground experience as well. A good grappler doesn’t have to really look to slap on submissions, meaning, he can keep an eye on the other guys, make sure he keeps his opponent between him and the other guys and go for a submission, when he has the submission, break whatever submission he has so that guy can’t fight anymore or with less “weapons” (like one arm or one leg only)
   For the people who say BJJ is not effective on the street I say: “What if you trip and fall on your back, you don’t think it’s better to understand the ground game? Of course it is, because like I said, you can simply trip and fall.



    I give you an example how it helped me once:
    I was fighting three guys one time in Holland, one broke a glass on my head so I was bleeding profusely and felt my neck get warm, I felt what it was and I saw my hands were full of blood. So my thought was “OK, he has me, but I am going to return the favor”. So I grabbed him in a Thai clinch and pulled him forward and slapped a guillotine choke on. The other guys were trying to hit me, but I simply kept the guy in between myself and his friends and just deflected their punches with head movement and my shoulders (You don’t need to look at the person you are choking you since you have done this many times in training) When he fell down (was choked out) I kicked him first in the head (I had like 39 stitches in my head afterwards, I was pissed) and than I fought his buddies.
    Without grappling training I wouldn’t have known this. Also when somebody grabs you from the back, front, side, anywhere, “standing” you can still do a whole bunch of submissions, and quick ones that can dislocate shoulders, break arms etc
    But if you want to keep it simple, best thing for you, since you are a Thai Boxer already, go wrestle, so they can’t take you down, and even when they are better on their feet than you, you can take THEM down and go for G&P. Train for the G&P though, so that you can make quick work, because again, when his friends come to help him you don’t have a lot of time there
    This is what I always say, “It’s better to know and don’t need it, than to need it and don’t know it”
    When you train in BJJ with and without a Gi, focus a lot on reversals, in street fighting that’s pretty important
Godspeed!
Bas

December 18, 2014

Book Review: "Eskrima Street Defense" by Bong Abenir

Scratching your head trying to figure out the perfect stocking stuffer for the one stick swinging, balisong flipping martial artist on your list?  Tambuli Media's most recent FMA title "Eskrima Street Defense" by Bong Abenir just might fit the bill.  An affordable addition to any collection, Abenir's first book offers a direct approach to dealing with weapons in real world situations.

One of the first things that sticks out is the no nonsense approach Bong takes to the applications, incorporating fast powerful strikes with fast takedowns all the while utilizing his environment.  All keys when speaking about true self defense.  Offering common situation such as knife attacks, choke attempts, multiple attackers, as well as strikes Bong Abenir does not waste time going into complicated locks and convoluted flows.  Rather he takes a very pragmatic approach offering fundamental, simple movements that can be applied with purses, scarves, umbrella's, etc.

The pictures are laid out well and for the most part are very clear as to what is going on, though I would have liked to have seen numbered progressions for ease of reading and following.  Overall the book is written well but seemed a bit rushed, and offered minimal explanation.  I can't help but feel Abenir has a LOT more to offer and would like to see the result of some serious time spent on laying out a comprehensive treatise.



At just over $21 "Eskrima Street Defense" is a perfect sized stocking stuffer for the stickhead in your life.  Though I feel Tambuli has stronger, more comprehensive titles on Filipino Martial Arts, they remain the leader in publishing and disseminating knowledge focused specifically on SE Asian arts.  The importance of exposing these arts and teachers to the world cannot be understated.  Prior to Mr. Wiley talking about Bong Abenir I had never even heard of him nor his system.  I cannot help but wonder how many more arts are out there that are dying every single year simply because those teachers/fighters have not had the outside exposure to document their art!  A huge thank you is due to Mark Wiley and Tambuli Media for helping keep these arts alive at the very least in print form.  For instance my old friend Dan Medina just released his text on Derobio Escrima, a rather closed off / reserved art up until now.  It is amazing that we finally have a publisher propagating these lost arts! 

Click here to order "Eskrima Street Defense"

The Principles of Abenir Kalis
  • Don’t waste moves; be flexible.
  • A parry which does not incorporate an attack is wasteful movement.
  • A defense is an attack, an attack is a defense.
  • Overwhelm your enemy with multiple attacks.
  • Striking directly at the enemy’s flesh is preferable to blocking the enemy’s weapon.
  • Your fighting position should be designed to make you a difficult target to hit.
  • Don’t be overconfident; be alert at all times.
  • Be fiercer in your attack than your enemy.
  • Be strong in your defense, and powerful in your offense.
  • Move with speed and precision using correct distance against the enemy.
  • The faster you hit the target, the better.
  • Hit the nearest targets and those open to you.
  • Attack when you see an opening.
  • Employ your defensive skills when needed.
  • Attack, attack, attack until the assailant ceases to be a threat to your safety.
  • Hand techniques should correspond with footwork.
  • Avoid wide movements in delivering your blows. Strike without telegraphing your attack.
  • Wrist locks and disarming techniques are only incidental. A strike could cause a disarm that only counts as one beat which is faster and more practical to use than complicated locks during a heated encounter, especially against multiple opponents.
  • Only engage in a fight if no other option of escape is possible.
  • Run if you must, fight if you must

October 13, 2014

No Gi Baseball Bat Choke

Magid choking out Zac Maxwell with a baseball bat choke
 Scott Sievewright has been nailing a no gi version of the baseball bat choke (typically done with a gi) with a modified S grip.  What I love about the grappling arts... once you think you have learned every possible way to do something, some kid in the Midwest decides to blow all of our collective minds by simply thinking slightly outside the gi, er... box!
Principle... don't skip this pic

Here is the man himself Magid Hage showcasing the Baseball bat choke with a gi:


Here is our friend Ari up in Victoria teaching the no gi variation:


And finally we have Scott Sievewright (one of Red Schafers students) who has been nailing fools with this:



September 25, 2014

Tim Cartmell Will Teach You How To Be a Better Martial Artist

Hey guys, I need a training partner this weekend in Portland OR. for one of the best seminars you will ever participate in!!  

My friend and teacher Tim Cartmell will be visiting his students in Portland the weekend of September 26-28th.  All are welcome to the seminars which will be a combo of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and stand up self defense (bring both gi and no gi uniforms).

Friday September 26: 6-8pm
Saturday Sept. 27:      11-4 (one hour lunch)
Sunday Sept.28:          9am-11am


For further questions check out Ecole de Budo's website.  

September 22, 2014

Jeff Davidson & The Brotherhood of the Blade Coming To Seattle

25 year veteran of the Southeast Asian and African martial arts Jeff Davidson is coming to Seattle for the first time October 4-5th 2014,  to offer a weekend of training aimed at improving your martial prowess and teaching some essential self defense.  This promises to be a great weekend of learning and fun with sticks and knives!  Open to all levels of experience and ranks, for more information on the seminar click here

Check out these video clips of Jeff teaching:









September 21, 2014

Canne de Combat with Salem Assli

I had the distinct fortune of training with Prof. Salem Assli on Friday night in the art of Canne de Combat, French cane combat.  This was the first time he had ever taught the art in the Pacific NW and over 25 folks showed their support at MKG Seattle for the seminar.  My interest was piqued because of my Kali background and the fact that Canne de Combat is not that common over here.

The first thing that struck me was the emphasis on posture and structure.  As if studying at the Paris Opera School of Ballet, Salem stated we could not learn the more advanced moves without perfecting our posture and technique.  The fluidity and grace with which Salem moved was truly inspiring.  His posture was never compromised as he demonstrated both basic and advanced techniques from Canne de Combat. 

Salem is a good instructor building us in steps and making the participants repeat the basic five strikes over and over before having us partner up and work both very regimented drills along with more free form type exercises.  This progression was very helpful in regards to remembering the movements that weren't so complex as they were different then what most are used to when working weapons (at least from a FMA perspective).

Technique wise the angles of attack were very familiar (only so many ways to swing a stick effectively) but the method of execution certainly was not.  Breaking down the basics Salem was constantly reminding us of the difference between sport and self defense, demonstrating the variations with speed and intent!  I must admit there is much more depth to the art then I originally gave credit and the fluidity in which Prof. Assli moved certainly got my attention.  His understanding of range and distance was second to none.  Very, very impressive!



My one and only criticism (was also my partners) was the incessant noise at MKG.  Though an impressively large and well equipped gym, the background noise of another class on the adjacent mat, the hum of fans and fluorescent lights, coupled with the grunting and dropping of weights in the other room from the Crossfit class was truly deafening.  To the point where even Prof. Assli stopped and asked if weights were being dropped above us!  Often times I could not hear the instructions from the instructor.  Not an environment conducive to learning, I can only imagine when classes are in full swing with all mats going!!! 

A big thank you to Professor Salem Assli who visits Seattle every year to offer Savate seminars.  Also thanks to Andy Wilson of MKG for hosting Salem.  And lastly to my awesome partner Lara for making it easy to learn and train in a seminar environment. 

September 5, 2014

Brotherhood of the Blade Seminar - Seattle, WA.

I am very pleased to announce that Three Harmonies Martial Arts will be hosting Guru Jeff Davidson for his very first visit to the Pacific NW where he will be sharing his knowledge of Kali and West African Martial Arts with us on October 4-5th 2014.  All levels of experience are welcome to join us for this unique and fun training opportunity to learn to work weapons better and to defend yourself against said weapons.

Brotherhood of the Blade
w/ Guru Jeff Davidson

October 4-5th 2014
942 N. 95th St.
Seattle, WA. 

Saturday October 4th:
10am-1pm
3-6pm

Sunday October 5th:
9am-11:30

$105 - Entire Weekend       
$65   - Single Session

*Please bring a pair of sticks, training knives (NO LIVE BLADES), eye protection, a notebook, and an open attitude and mind*

To Register or for questions please contact Jake Burroughs at [email protected] / 206-941-3232

Jeff Davidson brings over 25 years of practical martial skills to Seattle where he will be teaching his deep knowledge of the bladed arts along with sharing the pedagogy of Yoruba martial systems from West Africa.  We are fortunate to have someone so skilled stop by and share with us.  For more info click here. 






August 22, 2014

Tim Cartmell Visits the Rose City

My friend and teacher Tim Cartmell will be visiting his students in Portland the weekend of September 26-28th.  All are welcome to the seminars which will be a combo of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and stand up self defense (bring both gi and no gi uniforms). 

Friday September 26: 6-8pm
Saturday Sept. 27:      11-4 (one hour lunch)
Sunday Sept.28:          9am-11am


For further questions check out Ecole de Budo's website.  

August 5, 2014

The Art of Defensive Boxing

Thanks to my coach and friend Tim Cartmell who shared this on his website Shen Wu.  Excellent highlight of some of the greatest boxers of our time.  Great head movement and footwork are cornerstones to defense.  And for my students asking about the check hook... at 2:35 of the first clip you will see Ricky Hatton receive THE picture perfect check hook!    Watch and learn...





June 18, 2014

Six Life Saving Rules to Survive A Serious Fight

Once again Kru Doug Marcaida of Rochester Kali offers some solid advice in a nicely edited video for our viewing pleasure.  True training in self defense is becoming rare and hard to find.  Many martial arts academies gravitate towards the sportive aspects of their given style, often ignoring certain key aspects such as "dirty" fighting (whatever that means) and weapon engagement.  Some great food for thought in these short 6 minutes:



March 18, 2014

Uzi Tactical Pen - The Pen Is Truly Mightier Than the Blade

Uzi Tactical has released what could arguably be the best self defense tool created post 9/11, with the Uzi Tactical Pen w/ Glassbreaker #7. A completely functioning pen that is essentially a thrusting and hooking weapon in the trained hand, Uzi Tactical has designed an affordable, functioning self defense tool.

Available with a variety of ends including glass breakers and DNA catchers, as well as being available in black or gun metal, Uzi keeps things reasonable with all of their models coming in under $25 USD.  These vicious little beauties are perfect for those wanting a non-lethal alternative to a knife or gun, but not cinching in the leverage department.  Used just like a knife in either a standard grip (point up) or an "ice pick" (point down) grip, though the pen does not have a sharp edge on it the tapered point can easily penetrate skin and do enough soft tissue damage to be a serious deterrent.




You may recognize the brand Uzi as being synonymous with 1980's action flicks in that EVERYONE used an Uzi machine gun back then, with it being the THE go to in terms of compact machine guns.  In the past 30 years Uzi has branched out to include all sorts of tactical gear including self defense pens, watches and flashlights.  Though I have never owned one of their guns, Uzis tactical pen has really impressed me with its durability and flexibility of use. 

Intelligent design is paramount in the manufacture of any tool and Uzi has some smart engineers at the helm with this aircraft aluminum production.  For instance the flattened thumb pad a third of the way down the 5 3/4" shaft allows more leverage and power when using a thrust or conversely as a hammer fist with the glass breaker tip.  Both ends are easily removable / replaceable, and the length affords easy manipulation using as a hook.  

Absolutely the pen is effective as a thrusting and stabbing weapon, but as with ANY tool used for self defense training is key essential ingredient.  Melding quite smoothly with all the essentials of Pekiti Tirsia Kali, the Uzi Tactical Pen fits nicely in the hand regardless of grip and has a decent heft to it weighing in at just over 50 grams which offers enough bulk to pack a punch and not warp or break, all the while not being a burden in the pocket.  A strong clip secures the pen in any pocket with minimal to no wear and tear on the pocket lip.  That said I do not regularly wear dress pants so pay attention if you choose to wear it in business attire. 

The Uzi Tactical Glassbreaker #7 retails for $23.96 and is available by clicking here.  I look forward to reviewing other Uzi products, but in the meantime check out this affordable non-lethal self defense tool for every day carry.